Cookies on this site

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. By using our site you accept the terms of our Privacy Policy

Accept and close
 
Menu
Safety Centre
Recordkeeping
 

Recordkeeping

OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook (2015):

With recent changes to OSHA's injury and illness recording and reporting regulation, the OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook is no longer current.  The Handbook is replaced with Detailed Guidance for OSHA's Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Rule.  This page follows the same format as the Handbook and provides a compendium of existing agency approved policy, including the regulatory text and relevant decision discussion from the Preamble to the rule, Frequently Asked Questions and the Letters of Interpretation.

OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook is a compendium of existing agency approved policy, including the 2001 Recordkeeping rule (Regulatory text and relevant decision discussion from the Preamble to the rule), Frequently Asked Questions and the Letters of Interpretation.OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook (2005)

OSHA Reminds Employers to Post Injury/Illness Summaries Beginning February 1st

Beginning February 1st, employers who are required to keep the OSHA Form 300 Injury and Illness log must post a summary of the log.

Employers must post OSHA's Form 300A from February 1 to April 30, 2013 in a common area wherever notices to workers are usually posted. The summary must list the total numbers of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred in 2012.

All establishment summaries must be certified by a company executive. Copies of the OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301 are available for download on the OSHA Recordkeeping Web page. See OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook for more information on posting requirements for OSHA's Form 300A.

Osha Post Injury

Exercise Regime Constitutes Medical Treatment for OSHA Recordability

Following its recent interpretation that "therapeutic exercise" constitutes medical treatment for OSHA recordability purposes, OSHA has now stated that an exercise regime recommended by a Certified Athletic Trainer for an employee who exhibits any signs or symptoms of a work-related injury involves medical treatment and is a recordable case. OSHA made this interpretation in a letter recently posted on its website.

In the same letter, OSHA also provided guidance on whether specific types of exercise constitutes medical treatment. OSHA states that if a Certified Athletic Trainer "utilizes stretching" to relieve symptoms of a work-related injury or illness, the "stretching" constitutes medical treatment. OSHA also states that a written home exercise program provided by a Certified Athletic Trainer for signs or symptoms of a work-related injury or illness constitutes medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes.

OSHA's interpretation is particularly important for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), as MSDs are often managed, in part, through exercise regimes. OSHA does note in the letter that exercise given as a purely precautionary measure (i.e., before the onsite of signs or symptoms) would not qualify for recordability. However, if an employee experiences any signs or symptoms of a work-related injury or illness - even very early signs or symptoms - exercise given to manage those signs or symptoms would constitute medical treatment for recordability purposes.

Employers should take note of this new interpretation and adjust their recordkeeping practices accordingly.

Recordkeeping

OSHA Recordkeeping Page has the OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements, along with any updates to the OSHA Recordkeeping regulation (29 CFR 1904).

Also listed are the Handbook and Training Presentations.